Thoughts on I Was a Bottom-Tier Bureaucrat for 1,500 Years, and the Demon King Made Me a Minister

I Was a Bottom-Tier Bureaucrat for 1,500 Years and the Demon King Made a Minister is a light novel spin-off of I’ve Been Killing Slimes for 300 Years and Maxed Out My Level, focusing on Beelzebub and how she became the Minster of Agriculture.
It is written by Kisetsu Morita, and illustrated by Benio – just like the I’ve Been Killing Slimes light novels. This one is a stand-alone volume, though. Yen Press licensed it for an English release.

I Was a Bottom-Tier Bureaucrat for 1500 Years and the Demon King Made Me a Minister

Front cover of I Was a Bottom-Tier Bureaucrat for 1,500 Years, and the Demon King Made Me a Minister, featuring Beelzebub

A DEVIL’S WORK IS NEVER DONE
Beelzebub s a demon of many roles – minister of agriculture, Azusa’s “big sister,” and the demon king’s closest confidant. Before her illustrious rise to power, though, she was just a low-ranking pencil pusher in the government with no ambitions, no dreams, and no adventure in her life. Then, on a whim of the newly coronated demon king, she received the biggest and most terrifying promotion imaginable! How will Beelzebub handle the sudden responsibilities of the entire Ministry of Agriculture?!
Originally published as short stories in the hugely popular I’ve Been Killing Slimes for 300 Years and Maxed Out My Level, the spin-off is back with brand-new illustrations and additional tales from the demon lands!

I’d imagine the first question one might have about this spin-off light novel is something like “is this worth it if the short stories were originally published in I’ve Been Killing Slimes for 300 Years and Maxed Out My Level?” My answer to that would be yes, particularly if you are a fan of Beelzebub.
For a start, there are some new stories to enjoy here, and as already mentioned, new illustrations to enjoy. Plus, it’s nice having all off those stories collected together in one place, instead of having to find whichever volumes of I’ve Been Killing Slimes contain said stories.

With Beelzebub being the main character, there’s plenty of focus on the demon side of things. Vania, Fatla, and Pecora, of course, all have major roles to play in this light novel. Seeing Beelzebub’s interactions with the other demons is a lot of fun. Even more so considering we get to see the beginning of her working relationship with them; it takes Beelzebub some time to properly sink into her role as minister of agriculture.

Whilst it is fun to relive some of the stories that were included in I’ve Been Killing Slimes, the new tales included in the light novel are no slouches, either. We get some rather intimate Pecora x Beelzebub moments, even if Beelzebub isn’t exactly keen on that.
However, for me, the highlight of the entire light novel would probably have to be Beelzebub’s parents. They’re unlike any other characters we’ve seen so far in I’ve Been Killing Slimes, and they are hilarious. Honestly, this light novel might be worth it just for that chapter alone.

Admittedly, all the chapters in this light novel are good. We even get a few familiar faces showing up here and there. The first one is pretty funny, because Beelzebub acknowledges that she probably wouldn’t remember them if they were ever to meet again…
That’s also briefly touched upon later on in the light novel, too, and it’s quite a coincidence how hazy everyone’s memories seems to be about that…

I Was a Bottom-Tier Bureaucrat for 1,500 Years, and the Demon King Made Me a Minister is definitely a worthy addition to the I’ve Been Killing Slimes series, giving us a glimpse of that world quite some time before Azusa descended upon it. If you like I’ve Been Killing Slimes, I’m pretty confident you’ll enjoy this spin-off as well. Definitely one I highly recommend.

About Rory

I enjoy writing, manga, anime and video games, so naturally here on my blog, you will find anime reviews, Nintendo news and other such things that I deem interesting.
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