Rory’s Reviews: Sakura Quest

Sakura QuestSakura Quest is a twenty-five episode anime series that was produced by P.A. Works. Soichi Masui was the director for the series, and the writer was Masahiro Yokotani.
The show started during the spring 2017 season of anime, and reached its conclusion during the summer 2017 season.
Sakura Quest is available to watch on Crunchyroll.

Sakura Quest begins with main character Yoshino Koharu trying to get a job in Tokyo. Being met with several rejections makes her a very relatable character right from the get-go.
When Yoshino receives an offer to work with the tourism board of a village called Manoyama as their ‘Queen’, she accepts.

Sakura Quest

The ‘Queen’ of Manoyama, Yoshino Koharu

Yoshino believes the contract is only for a day, but it turns out it is a year-long contract – and to compound matters, she was only hired due to a case of mistaken identity. Still, she reluctantly accepts the role.

Due to being produced by P.A. Works, Sakura Quest gets compared to Shirobako a fair bit. Considering the subject matters are vastly different things, it may not be an entirely fair comparison.
Sakura Quest deserves to be judged on its own merits, but do its own merits make it a good show?

SQ

One of the ministers, Shiori, with the queen

With twenty-five episodes, Sakura Quest has plenty of time to develop its characters – and the characters are arguably the strongest part of this anime. The main cast consists of Yoshino and her ministers – four other girls who work with the tourism board.
The early parts of the series focus on Yoshino trying to enlist the help of the ministers – they have their own reservations about joining her and overcoming them is a key part of their characterisation.
The main cast are all great, and it may prove to be a little tough to pick out a favourite – which is a good thing, as it goes to show that they are all compelling characters.

SQ - Riri

Another one of the ministers, Ririko

The supporting cast are all pretty great as well. Some seem a bit abrasive at first – Ririko’s grandmother seems all too willing to drag Yoshino into her grudge against the head of the tourism board. Fortunately, things improve on that front as the show goes on.
Arguably the most notable member of the supporting cast is the blonde man known as ‘Sandal’. His unique voice is rather pleasant to listen to, making him ideal for the next episode previews, as well as the words of wisdom he tends to share during the show. Vinay Murthy is responsible for providing his voice.
Some members of the supporting cast even get their own turns in the spotlight.

Though Sakura Quest does have its share of emotional and downright sad moments, it is ultimately an anime that just feels good to watch. It makes you genuinely care about its characters, and as a result, you find yourself caring about the village of Manoyama.
Manoyama itself goes through a fair few trials and tribulations. The media gets involved at one point, and the resulting programme ends up being vastly different from what the residents of Manoyama expected.

The soundtrack is pleasant enough, though the stand out song might just be the one performed during a particular festival. Everything else serves its purpose pretty well.

One of the challenges that Yoshino is presented with overcoming in Sakura Quest is trying to get the people of Manoyama to accept her despite being an outside. They are also pretty set in their ways, which makes things even more difficult.
Is Yoshino able to overcome these challenges? Well, you’d have to watch Sakura Quest yourself to find out – it is certainly well worth investing your time in.

Score: 9/10
Sakura Quest has a real feel-good factor, and its utterly charming cast make it a real delight to watch.

About Rory

I enjoy writing, manga, anime and video games, so naturally here on my blog, you will find anime reviews, Nintendo news and other such things that I deem interesting.
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